Academics

CPHP-Related Courses at the Graduate School of Public Health
Student Public Health Epidemic Response Effort
Graduate School of Public Health
Bernard D. Goldstein Student Award in Environmental Health Disparities and in Public Health Practice
Catherine Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award: Public Health in Service to the Underserved
CPHP Award for Translation and Application of Research to Public Health Policy and Practice


CPHP-related Courses at the Graduate School of Public Health

Current Issues in Health Law (HPM 2005)

This course introduces students to cutting-edge issues in public health law, health law, and policy. The course focuses on developments in health care and public health, particularly as they affect medically underserved populations, with implications for lawyers and public health practitioners as policy makers. It also introduces students to the variety of settings in which lawyers and public health practitioners are involved in law.

Health Law and Ethics (HPM 2130)

This course introduces students to the legal and ethical issues which impact the administration and delivery of health services. It is designed to provide students with the practical knowledge needed to identify legal issues inherent in health care and public health administration and to understand the legal ramifications of administrative and management decisions. Through lecture and class discussion four main subject areas are presented: an introduction to the legal system, legal issues in managing health care organizations, regulating quality of care, and public health legal authority.

Introduction to Health Care Compliance (HPM 2134)

This course provides an overview of the legal landscape regarding health care compliance and demonstrates the importance of compliance for health care organizations. As one of the most highly regulated industries in the United States, health care entities are required to comply with numerous statutes and regulations at the federal and state level, with harsh penalties for non-compliance. Thus, individuals involved in the administration and delivery of health care must be well versed in these laws and regulations, as well as the strategies health care entities employ to address particular compliance concerns. Specific topics include fraud and abuse; data privacy and security; the elements of effective compliance programs; audits, investigations, and self-disclosures; and significant compliance risk areas for various health care entities.

Public Health Law and Ethics (HPM 2131 and LAW 5089)

Public health law affects the lives and the livelihoods of each person every day.  This is a survey course intended to introduce students to the most commonly encountered local, national, and world public health legal and ethical issues associated with chronic disease, infectious disease, injury prevention, information privacy and data sharing, reproductive rights, environmental public health, occupational safety, and genomics.

Law in Public Health Practice (HPM 2133)

This course is the first of its kind offered at the University of Pittsburgh: a practice-based, collaborative learning experience for public health and law students. Together, students will develop interventions relating to issues identified by a public health practice partner as requiring the expertise of both cohorts. Recent projects have included analyzing the regulation of tattoo parlors and the opioid epidemic.

 

Student Public Health Epidemic Response Effort

Student Public Health Epidemic Response Effort (SPHERE)

SPHERE is an organization of Pitt Public Health students and community members interested in epidemic response, increasing community preparedness, and gaining hands-on experience. SPHERE members participate in outbreak or disaster response activities with local and state health departments, attend monthly meetings, participate in epidemiological investigation trainings, and volunteer at community health events and promotions. All masters and doctoral students enrolled at Pitt Public Health are eligible for SPHERE membership.

Bernard D. Goldstein Student Award in Environmental Health Disparities and in Public Health Practice

The Bernard D. Goldstein Award was established in 2005 by Dr. Bernard Goldstein, then dean of Pitt Public Health and a professor in Environmental and Occupational Health, and his wife, Russellyn Carruth, an adjunct professor in Environmental and Occupational Health. The award was established for students or postdoctoral fellows at Pitt Public Health and is given alternately in one of two areas: 1) Environmental Health Disparities or 2) Public Health Practice. The award is available annually to eligible students through a competitive application process. Recipients may use the award to defray the costs of, for example, tuition, travel to a conference, membership in a professional organization, textbooks, courses in public speaking or scientific writing, or other opportunities that would enhance their training as a public health practitioner.

The application is available annually in August on the Pitt Public Health website (www.publichealth.pitt.edu and go to Admissions and Aid, Tuition and Financial-Aid, Types of Aid, Grants and Scholarships, Pitt Public Health Aid). Complete your application and attach a brief project overview describing the project or course of study that the applicant has undertaken with either the Center for Health Equity (even numbered years) or the Center for Public Health Practice (odd numbered years) and faculty contact information for the faculty member with which the applicant is working or studying. Applications are due mid-November. Download the application for the full set of instructions.

Catherine Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award: Public Health in Service to the Underserved

The Catherine Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award honors outstanding students from the school’s professional degree programs committed to serving the needs of disadvantaged communities. The award is open to all Pitt Public Health students who have been accepted to the annual Dean’s Day competition and whose project shows a commitment to public health service to the underserved.

The award was established to honor the memory of Ms. Cartier Ulrich who was committed to improving the health of underserved populations and worked toward that goal with compassion and dedication. Originally a pharmacist from Switzerland, Ms. Cartier Ulrich came to Pittsburgh to enter Pitt Public Health where she was enrolled in the Doctor of Public Health program. Her focus of research was cancer screening in the African-American population. She had planned to build on this research with her Schweitzer project by applying this information to a clinic working with the underserved. Tragically, she and her husband, Iwan Ulrich were killed in a car accident during a vacation on the West Coast on July 3, 2000.

The award recipient will be selected by special ballot on Dean’s Day based on an average of the following questions:

  1. Does the research address a topic of importance for an underserved population or community using appropriate methods?
  2. Was the research conducted in collaboration with a community-based organization or program having an established or defined relationship to the underserved population or community?
  3. Is there evidence that the research process and/or results had value to the organization or program?
  4. Did the research contribute to improving the health of, or the health-related resources available to this population or community?

CPHP Award for Translation and Application of Research to Public Health Policy and Practice

The CPHP Award honors the Pitt Public Health Dean’s Day project best demonstrating a contribution to policy making and/or applications for improving practice.

The recipient will be selected by special ballot on Dean’s Day based on an average of the following questions:

  1. Does the research provide insights for policy making and/or applications for improving practice?
  2. Does the research question address a topic of importance for public health policy or practice?
  3. Does the presentation of research methods provide evidence of engagement with or involvement of policy makers or practitioners?
  4. Is there explicit attention to policy or practice applications in the interpretation of results and/or discussion of implications?
  5. Are the conclusions relevant to improving public health policy and/or practice?

Graduate School of Public Health

The Graduate School of Public Health is one of the nation's leading schools of public health, and has consistently ranked among the top schools of public health based on funding from the National Institutes of Health. All seven of the school’s outstanding departments boast a diverse faculty, rich in backgrounds, disciplinary approaches, and research interests. The Center for Public Health Practice is located within Pitt Public Health.