Archive

Previous News
Previous Student Awards
Previous Projects

Previous News


Pitt Class Presenting Naloxone Recommendations to National Public Health Group

November 2, 2016

A University of Pittsburgh public health law class that recently presented five recommendations for curbing opioid deaths in the region using naloxone to the Allegheny County Health Department will share those recommendations today at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting in Denver.

The two-year-old class, Law in Public Health Practice, focused its semester-long research into tackling opioid abuse on three at-risk populations: veterans, inmates, and schoolchildren. In a 122-page report, the class offered five recommendations, including offering naloxone and training on its use to inmates with a history of opioid abuse upon their release from Allegheny County Jail; offering medication-assisted treatment to affected inmates; and finding ways to provide naloxone to veterans and their families through a collaboration with the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. Read More

Introducing Crossroads: Law and Public Health

October 27, 2016

The Center for Public Health Practice (CPHP) is pleased to introduce Crossroads: Law and Public Health, a bimonthly open-access column on JPHMP Direct authored by our own Elizabeth Van Nostrand, JD and Tina Batra Hershey, JD, MPH. JPHMP Direct is the multimedia companion site of the Journal of Public Health Management & Practice, a bimonthly peer-reviewed journal guided by a multidisciplinary editorial board of administrators, practitioners, and scientists.

Check out the inaugural column here and stay informed by subscribing to the JPHMP Direct RSS Feed

Practice-based Multidisciplinary Course "Law and Public Health Practice" Addresses the Opioid Epidemic

May 16, 2016Opioid Pills

“Law and Public Health Practice” was created by Elizabeth Van Nostrand, JD, faculty at the Center for Public Health Practice, as a project of her 2014 Robert Wood Johnson Future of Public Health Law Education Faculty Fellowship. The public health issue focused on in the course each year is determined in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department.See the University Times to learn more about this year's focus, the opioid epidemic.

 

CPHP Partners with the Pennsylvania Department of Health on WalkWorks to Increase Physical Activity in Western PA

2014

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health Center for Public Health Practice and the Pennsylvania Department of Health have created WalkWorks, an effort to increase physical activity among people of all ages and abilities in Western Pennsylvania by developing community-based walking programs.
The initiative will establish local walking routes and enhance social support for people who would like to increase their level of physical activity. Areas slated for immediate implementation of the WalkWorks program include Cambria, Crawford, Greene, McKean, Venango and Washington counties, which have been identified as among those with the greatest burden of chronic disease in Opioid PillsPennsylvania.
"Ultimately, the goal is to promote change in local policies to encourage more people to walk," said WalkWorks advisor George Huber, J.D., associate dean for public policy, Pitt Public Health. "We are building momentum and looking at policies at the local level that can be modified to support pedestrian transportation."
WalkWorks aims to reduce barriers to and increase participation in physical activity for individuals of all ages and abilities. "We have assembled a team of health educators, public health practitioners and researchers at Pitt Public Health to help local communities in our region identify and mark safe walking routes, promote the walking routes to community members and establish guided community-based walking groups," said WalkWorks director Linda Duchak, Ed.M., C.H.E.S.
In their physical activity guidelines, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that adults aged 18 to 64 get at least 2.5 hours of moderate intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, per week.
"This program can improve the health and quality of life of everyone in our communities. At the same time, it can help to lower our rates of obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure," said William J. McMahon, M.D., a retired physician in Washington County, Pennsylvania, a member of the Washington County WalkWorks coalition and a WalkWorks walking group leader.
Local sponsors of the WalkWorks program include the Center for Rural Health Practice at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford; Crawford Health Improvement Coalition; Greene County Human Services; Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center; Oil City Area YMCA; and Washington County Health Partners, Inc.


This publication was supported by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (3U58DP001987-01S2). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official views of the CDC.

Dynamics of Preparedness Conference Special Issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

September 2013

The University of Pittsburgh MIDAS National Center of Excellence held the Dynamics of Preparedness Conference October 22–24, 2012. This public health systems conference brought together researchers, public policy makers, and research sponsors to present, critique, and propose innovative methods for the study of emergency preparedness in public health systems.
Results from the conference were published in a special issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. Conference participants heard about innovative methods and novel approaches to measure and evaluate public health systems in emergencies. They critiqued the rigor and quality of research output and flagged issues for which a better base in evidence was needed. They considered whether and how research in preparedness would be sustainable in the future. We acknowledge and thank the University of Pittsburgh's MIDAS Center of Excellence for its support of both the Dynamics of Preparedness Conference and this special issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice.
Continue Reading

Increasing Physical Activity—A Network of Walking Groups Keeps Rural Pennsylvania Moving

Opioid Pills
September 2013

Engaging in physical activity can be a challenge in rural areas, where sidewalks are scarce, fitness facilities are limited, and there's little access to public transportation. In western Pennsylvania, many residents are confronted with this issue on a daily basis. To combat this, the Pennsylvania Department of Health and the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health created WalkWorks, a group-based walking program implemented in six counties: Cambria, Crawford, Greene, McKean, Venango, and Washington. Continue Reading

 


Public Partnership by Christine H. O'Toole

Opioid Pills
Fall 2013

Last summer, 10 interns from Pitt Public Health detoured from their usual commutes to Parran and Crabtree halls to the nearby headquarters of the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). The group was mining a trove of public health gold: the results of the recent Allegheny County Health Survey (ACHS) of local residents. They paused at some troubling results.
Continue Reading

 



Helping Hospitals Address Community Health Needs Webinar Series

Opioid Pills
Fall 2013

Pitt Public Health is committed to improving the health of Pennsylvanians. Our team of public health experts can help hospitals comply with the requirements of community health under the new federal tax laws and make a difference in the health status of their service populations. Training is available through the federally funded Pennsylvania Public Health Training Center, a program of the Center for Public Health Practice. You, your staff and your consultants can learn how to align the new reporting requirements with your strategic goals and resources by utilizing our training opportunities and resources. Together, we can impact health outcomes in Pennsylvania by integrating health care and
public health. Learn More

Can Pitt Public Health have a greater impact on Public Health Policy & Practice?

Opioid Pills
December 19, 2007

Pitt Public Health is committed to improving the health of Pennsylvanians. Our team of public health experts can help hospitals comply with the requirements of community health under the new federal tax laws and make a difference in the health status of their service populations. Training is available through the federally funded Pennsylvania Public Health Training Center, a program of the Center for Public Health Practice. You, your staff and your consultants can learn how to align the new reporting requirements with your strategic goals and resources by utilizing our training opportunities and resources. Together, we can impact health outcomes in Pennsylvania by integrating health care and
public health. Learn More

 

Previous Student Awards


Dean's Day

 

 

Opioid Pills

The Catherine Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award Public Health in Service to the Underserved

The Catherine Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award honors outstanding students from the school’s professional degree programs committed to serving the needs of disadvantaged communities. The award is open to all Pitt Public Health students who have been accepted to the annual Dean’s Day competition and whose project shows a commitment to public health service to the underserved.

The award was established to honor the memory of Ms. Cartier Ulrich who was committed to improving the health of underserved populations and worked toward that goal with compassion and dedication. Originally a pharmacist from Switzerland, Ms. Cartier Ulrich came to Pittsburgh to enter Pitt Public Health where she was enrolled in the Doctor of Public Health program. Her focus of research was cancer screening in the African-American population. She had planned to build on this research with her Schweitzer project by applying this information to a clinic working with the underserved. Tragically, she and her husband, Iwan Ulrich were killed in a car accident during a vacation on the West Coast on July 3, 2000.

CPHP Award for Translation and Application of Research to Public Health Policy and Practice

The CPHP Award honors the Pitt Public Health Dean’s Day project best demonstrating a contribution to policy making and/or applications for improving practice.

The Center for Public Health Practice is pleased to announce the following awards:

2016

Julia Draghiciu, a student in the Department of Infectious Disease and Microbiology (IDM), received the CPHP Award for her project, “Animal Bite and Rabies Post Exposure Prophylaxis Reporting in Central Zone, Alberta, Canada.”

Maria Aguiluz-Abunto, an MMPH student, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master’s level project, "Health and Wellness at Gwen's Girls: A Bridging the Gaps Pittsburgh practicum experience."

Steven Meanley, a student in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences (BCHS), received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for his doctoral level project “Identifying Unaware HIV-Positive Status among HIV-Positive Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in the U.S."

2015

Samantha Ciaravino, a student in the BCHS, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Emergence of Gender Inequitable Practice in Adolescence."

Sarah Zelazny, a student in BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master’s level project, "Client Perspectives on Brochure-based Intimate Partner Violence & Reproductive Coercion Intervention in Clinical Settings."

Maria Catrina Jaime, a student in BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her doctoral level project “Community Research Ethics Training in Practice: A partnered approach to certification."

2014

Brianna McDonough, a student in BCHS, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Incorporating Preparedness Messages into a Home Visiting Program: A maternal and child health initiative."

Jennifer Sloan, also of BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master's level project, "Birmingham Health Links: Addressing social determinants of health in a clinical setting."

2013

Olivia Houck, a student in IDM, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Modeling Staffing Dynamics for POD Operations in an Infectious Disease Emergency."

Samantha Malone, also of IDM, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Public Health and High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing."

Leannea Adamson, a student in BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master’s level project, "Group Engagement as a Complement to One on One Mentoring: Preliminary Data from a Longitudinal Study Designed to Reduce Repeat Teen Pregnancy."

Lynne Marshall, a student in the Department of Epidemiology, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her doctoral level project "A Comparison of Circulatory and Respiratory Hospitalization Rates of Coal Mining and Non-Coal Mining Counties in West Virginia: A Preliminary Analysis."

2012

Megan Swanson, a student in IDM, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Influenza Antibody Testing in Allegheny County."

Aishwarya Arjunan, a student in the Department of Human Genetics, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master’s level project, "A Systematic Evaluation of a Newborn Screening Program for Sickle Cell Disease in Gujarat, India.”

Darren Morton, a student in BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for his doctoral level project "Increasing the Number of African American Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Participate in Research."

2011

Opioid Pills

Tina-Marie Assi, PhD, a recent graduate from the Department of Epidemiology, received the CPHP Award for her project, "Impacts of Introducing the Influenza Vaccine through the Trang Province, Thailand, Routine Vaccine Supply Chain."

Kimberly Rak, a student in BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her master’s level project, "Sexual Health and Positive Relationships: Perceptions of Urban Youth and Parents."

Mary Hawk, also of BCHS, received the Cartier Ulrich Memorial Award for her doctoral level project "The Effects of a Harm Reduction Housing Program on the Viral Loads of Homeless Individuals Living with HIV/AIDS."

Bernard D. Goldstein Student Award in Environmental Health Disparities and in Public Health Practice

The Bernard D. Goldstein Award was established in 2005 by Dr. Bernard Goldstein, then dean of Pitt Public Health and a professor in Environmental and Occupational Health, and his wife, Russellyn Carruth, an adjunct professor in Environmental and Occupational Health. The award was established for students or postdoctoral fellows at Pitt Public Health and is given alternately in one of two areas: 1) Environmental Health Disparities or 2) Public Health Practice. The award is available annually to eligible students through a competitive application process.

2013

Michelle Basque, a Master of Public Health student in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, received the Bernard D. Goldstein Award for her work with the Indicators for Stress Adaption Analytics Project (ISAAC) of the Public Health Adaptive Systems Studies. Using a new metric, ISAAC, Ms. Basque works with local health jurisdictions, enabling them to better understand their role in an emergency response, thus allowing them to strengthen their preparedness plans.

2011

Opioid Pills

Luis Duran, MPH, MPIA, a Doctor of Public Health student in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, received the The Bernard D. Goldstein Award for his work with the Public Health Systems Indicators Project of the Public Health Adaptive Systems Studies. Using the dataset of the NACCHO Profile Survey of 2008 to create a geospatial platform for characterizing local public health capacities at the county level, Mr. Duran has helped to illustrate the heterogeneities among counties, both within states and across the nation.

 

Previous Projects


Graduate Certificate Program in Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response

The Graduate Certificate Program in Public Health Preparedness and Disaster Response was founded in 2003 as a response to the growing threats to the public's health. This program has continued under the Center for Public Health Practice. The certificate program is not currently admitting new students.

Center for Public Health Preparedness (UPCPHP)

The University of Pittsburgh Center for Public Health Preparedness (UPCPHP) provided frontline public health and health care professionals with access to national and local preparedness information and public health competency-based training resources. Funding for UPCPHP was provided through the Center for Public Health Practice by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2004 to 2010.

Pittsburgh Influenza Prevention Project (PIPP)

The Pittsburgh Influenza Prevention Project (PIPP) was a three year partnership with the Pittsburgh Public Schools to understand if non-pharmaceutical interventions were effective in reducing influenza in school children, grades K-5.  There were 10 schools.  Five schools received a WHACK THE FLU intervention; 5 did not. Absences were monitored in all schools.

School Based Research and Practice Network (SBRPN)

Established in 2008, the School Based Research and Practice Network (SBRPN) was a partnership between the Center for Public Health Practice in the Graduate School of Public Health and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI). The network acted as a liaison between investigators and school administrators, assisted investigators in all facets of community-engaged research in schools, and supported the use of research results to inform policy.